The Marquee Club - A tribute site dedicated to the history of the legendary Marquee club at London's 90 Wardour street.

Vangelis - Hypothesis

Vangelis

Vangelis
"Hypothesis"
Released in 1980 (Charly).
Recorded in 1971 at the Marquee Studios.
Engineer: Phil Dunne

This album consist of a series of improvisation sessions that Vangelis played at Marquee Studios in 1971 and produced by manager Giorgio Gomelsky, but they were never supposed to be released as an album by the Greek artist. In 1980 Charly Records released these recordings in two separate albums, claiming they owned the rights and without the artist's permission. Consequently, Vangelis took the label to court and got to get the albums off the market. This album was also later reissued with a different cover under the title of "Visions of the Future".


starMemories on this recording:

"Vangelis' original intention in 1968 was to reach London where there was a very strong musical (and more 'serious' than in Paris) scene he was interested in exploring. I thought that now that he had the time - Aphrodita's Child had broken up after "666" - it would be a good idea. I could introduce him to the very best musicians (I worked there for 15 years and obviously knew the scene) and put together an interesting collaborative project. A guy called Karakos (who had founded BYG Records and later Celluloid) decided to back the project with the intention of eventually releasing the tapes on his label in Paris. He dealt directly with Vangelis and the Marquee Studio. I was paid a flat fee ($2000 if I remember correctly!) for producing, but since it was partly my initiative, I didn't mind. I was very excited about the project and what it could do for Vangelis and progressive rock music."

"After the original sessions in London, we returned to Paris. The idea here was to get the masters and study what overdubs and additions were fruitful in order to complete the production. Karakos had agreed not to release anything until finished and approved by Vangelis and myself. What happened then would indeed make a great movie about the muck and muddle and tortuousness of the music business."

"Karakos' company went bankrupt and his ex-partner Jean Luc Young took over the catalogue (don't ask me how!) and started Charly Records. Of course he knew of these sessions and wanted to release them. The problem was, the studio in London was owed money and they wouldn't release the tapes. Somehow, Jean Luc got the Marquee people to bring the tapes to Paris and once in his possession, pretending a visit to the toilet, actually left them empty-handed (no payment) in the restaurant where they had met!!"

www.elsew.com, 2000.
Interview by Dennis Lodewijks.